Search
Close this search box.

CCR used to create world’s first ‘carbon-negative radio advert’

By

Carbon-negative
Advertisement

A Swedish energy company has used a closed-circuit rebreather in a bid to create the world's first ‘carbon-negative radio advert' on a commercial radio recording.

A human exhales four per cent carbon dioxide with every breath, a natural consequence of breathing and speaking. However, for Skellefteå Kraft, which has long used recycled film clips to produce climate-smart advertising films, even these small emissions are valuable to avoid.

Together with Swedish advertising agency Volt, Skellefteå Kraft has developed an unusual method to eliminate the human emissions from voice actors starring in radio commercials. ‘The Carbon Negative Radio Ad' is recorded on inhalation, where the exhaled air is then captured in a CCR.

The Carbon Negative Radio Ad

In this way, the carbon dioxide from exhalation is captured and bound, preventing it from reaching the atmosphere. The Carbon Negative Radio Ad captured 470 mg of carbon dioxide.

“Sometimes the solution to big challenges can be as childishly simple as it is absurd. We are incredibly grateful for the trust and the opportunity to break new ground with this revolutionizing recording technique during prime time radio,” said Samuel SkwarskiRojan Munthe, and Kristoffer Wernald, creatives at Volt, in a joint comment.

“Skellefteå Kraft has an ambition to be 100% renewable in everything we do and to create innovative products and services. Therefore, it is also completely natural for us to continue exploring how the advertising we produce and broadcast can be as climate-smart as possible,” says AnkiHögdahl, Marketing Communications Manager at SkellefteåKraft.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

LET’S KEEP IN TOUCH!

Get a weekly roundup of all Scuba Diver news and articles
We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.
Mark Evans
Mark Evans
Scuba Diver's Editorial Director Mark Evans has been in the diving industry for nearly 25 years, and has been diving since he was just 12 years old. nearly 40-odd years later and he is still addicted to the underwater world.
Latest Stories
Advertisement
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x