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MARK EVANS: Grenada shipwrecks new and old

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After their visit to the Bianca C, the Scuba Diver team decided to mix up a couple of older Grenadian shipwrecks with a brand, spanking new one which only sank a few months ago.

Aquanauts Grenada were our dive centre for the day, and we headed out at speed on their big, comfortable boat into the Atlantic – a good eight miles out from shore – for our first dive, the Persia II, Grenada's newest addition to the underwater fleet of shipwrecks. It is so new that apart from the obligatory lion fish, there were few other creatures calling it home yet, but marine growth is already starting and give it a few more months, others will move in for sure. Well worth a visit now in such a raw state, though.

shipwrecks 1

Next up was a return to the Hema I, and once again it was swarming with nurse sharks. There was quite a strong current running across the wreck this time, which made shooting – and modelling for Gerlinde – extremely challenging, but still bagged some decent imagery. Plus, it was a cracking dive as always!

shipwrecks 2

The afternoon saw the team run out to the Shakem, a cargo ship that went down many years ago carrying a load of cement, the hardened remnants of which can still be seen in the holds. I recalled it being very heavily colonised by coral ten years ago, and it is even more smothered now. Parts of the wreck don't even look like being man-made anymore, there is so much growth covering it.

www.puredivinggrenada.com

https://www.scubadivermag.com/mark-evans-grenada-bianca-c/

Mark Evans
Mark Evans
Scuba Diver's Editorial Director Mark Evans has been in the diving industry for nearly 25 years, and has been diving since he was just 12 years old. nearly 40-odd years later and he is still addicted to the underwater world.
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