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Fourth Element releases OceanPositive face masks

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Fourth Element has released OceanPositive face masks, which are designed to offer protection and comfort using Econyl regenerated nylon, made in part from lost fishing nets.

Fourth Element's new face masks are made using off-cuts from their already recycled swimwear fabric, meaning waste is dramatically reduced. So wearers can keep themselves and others safe without adding to environmental damage.

face masks

Available in four colourways, the masks are secured with a double cord and knotted around the back of the head to avoid discomfort on the ears, but can be easily converted to ear loops if needed. Each mask comes with three PM 2.5 filters, which have five layers of filtration, including an activated carbon core layer.

The masks are £11.99, and packs of filters are £6.99 (10-pack) and £11.99 (20-pack).

face masks

REDUCE AND REUSE
While disposable masks are a necessity for some, a reusable mask is a great option in order to reduce the amount of raw materials used and single-use products ending up in land fill, or worse, in the ocean. OceanPositive masks (minus the filter) can be machine washed and reused indefinitely.

face masks

RECYCLE
These face masks are made with Econyl 100 percent regenerated nylon, a significant percentage of which comes from fishing nets recovered from the sea. These ‘ghost nets' amount to over 600,000 tonnes of lost gear every year and continue to fish, long after they have been abandoned, accounting for the loss of many lives, from invertebrates to large marine mammals.

All over the world, dive teams are removing these ghost nets from the wrecks and reefs, often at great depths, and bringing them up to the surface, where they can be recycled into yarn to be used in our swimwear and face masks.

Available now at: www.fourthelement.com

Mark Evans
Mark Evans
Scuba Diver's Editor-in-Chief Mark Evans has been in the diving industry for nearly 25 years, and has been diving since he was just 12 years old. 30-odd years later and he is still addicted to the underwater world.

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